my dear disease do you exist?

The debate of whether a single cause attributable to the loss of Fraser River Sockeye wages on between scientists and those that have direct experience and first hand knowledge.  The metaphor of a single smoking gun serves to illustrate this elusiveness.  However is the discovery of a smoking gun truly unattainable or does someone wish for you NOT to find it.  Eventhough we could hear the gunshot, we can smell the gunpowder and the victim is lying there, does the lack of urgency, mean that the killer can clean its fingerprints and get as far from the scene as possible?

no smoking gun?
or actually, is there a smoking gun?

or does no one really want to find it?

my dear disease do you exist?
I tell you folks its not easy to tell, if this ease has been missed
if i don’t test, is it on my chest?
one fish two fish red fish… missing

the burden of truth is a cross to bear,
but the black and browns have starved out there
shall i just drag my heels …
so you can shoot a seal… lying?

Shall I be the unfortunate one who finds the smoking gun?
Will I be the outcast, the solo, the one
Have my principles been cautioned in front of me
Do I buy that this science is free?
Or created and purchased for only the blind to see?

Can Open-Net Fish Farms and Wild Salmon Co-Exist?

Steven Kelliher lawyer for the Aboriginal Aquaculture Association cross examines a panel at the Cohen Commission into the collapse of the Fraser River Sockeye. Industrial Aquaculture is seen by corporate interests as an economic saviour to First Nations communities in remote locations.  However in light of the steady decline of Wild Salmon Stocks; can open-net Fish Farming and Wild Salmon co-exist.  On this perspectives panel are the following:

  • Clare Backman (Director of Environmental Compliance and Community Relations, Marine Harvest Canada)
  • Alexandra Morton (Executive Director, Raincoast Research Society)
  • Mia Parker (formerly Manager, Regulatory Affairs, Grieg Seafood BC Ltd.)
  • Catherine Stewart (Salmon Farming Campaign Manager, Living Oceans Society)

Audio from the panel’s dramatic testimony on Sept 7, 2011 at the Cohen Commission

 

INQUIRY Art Exhibition, an insight into a people’s movement

Salmon in British Columbia is not only keystone species to our ECO System, but one that links us economically and culturally.  It is part of our West Coast identity.  Now imagine the real possibility of that species not being part of our communities.  Through almost the past 20 years the Wild Salmon stocks on BC’s West Coast have been in steady decline. In 2009 a massive collapse of the Fraser River Sockeye catalyzed a federal inquiry (cohencommission.ca).  The people in affected communities are standing up to the industrial and political forces that have put duress on Wild Salmon Stocks and those that depend on them.  The First Nations in BC depend on this resource as a food supply and a critical element to their culture.  The breakdown of First Nations social systems weakens the ecological awareness in the most remote places and the resistance to aggressive industrial development (ie. Damming of Rivers, Open Net Fish Farms and Oil Pipelines)

In May 2010, 7,000 people, led by Biologist Dr. Alexandra Morton walked to the lawns of the BC’s Government buildings in the largest environmental rally in the province’s history in order to stand up for Wild Salmon and against the damaging practices of industrial fish farming in BC’s open waters.  However, even with that massive peoples movement, little change has been made.  Even against multi-million dollar ad campaigns, lawsuits against activists, the suppression of scientific research, co-opting of NGO’s by industry, the Wild Salmon Warriors see the truth of what is happening in their waters, they are resilient, passionate and continue with creative actions to highlight the issue and sustain the movement.

The INQUIRY Arts Exhibition and Action Forum is an artist response to showcase the tragic absurdity, create dialogue and to inspire action.  Whether you are passionate about Salmon or not, it is important to know what is happening within the systems that are meant to protect the people’s resources.  But more importantly, how everyday people of all cultures are responding through every creative means they can.  This two day art show will feature creative works from artists who submitted works in an open call out.  It will also include a day of workshops and presentations from those within the movement.

Co-curated by Gallery Gachet Collective Members Pierre Leichner and J Peachy.

Participating Artists include: Leanne Hodges, Carl Chaplin, Anissa Reid, Joanne Probyn, 10 yr old Ta’Kaiya Blaney, Gunargie O’Sullivan, Pierre Leichner, J Peachy, Naomi Steinberg, Eddie Gardner, David Campbell and others.

Activist Forum presentations by: Jeremy Williams, Michelle Nickerson, Ivan Doumenc, Don Staniford, Damien Gillis and others.

For more information on the show, please also go to www.gachet.org